Before you get your puppy

Published on Dog Star Daily and written by Dr. Ian Dunbar, this free, puppy training booklet is filled with excellent advice and training guidelines for the new puppy owner. It can be easily downloaded from the  site so breeders can share the link with their new puppy owners to prepare them to properly manage the puppy, even before they take that new baby home. All breeders want to give their puppies the best opportunity to develop into the perfect family pet, and this booklet will give you, the breeder, a foundation for helping those new owners create a home and environment to start those pups off on the right foot.

Shared by:  Sally Gift, Mesa AZ

BEFORE YOU GET YOUR PUPPY

This book is simply a MUST READ for anyone thinking of getting a puppy. Puppies should be raised in an errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training set-up.  This is very easy to do and everything you need to know is described in this little book.  Otherwise, if puppies are allowed to eliminate anywhere and chew anything in their kennel, that’s what they’ll continue to do when you bring them home.  Most important, puppies must be socialized before they are three months old.  Preventing fearfulness and aggression is easy and fun whereas trying to resolve adult problems is difficult, time-consuming and not always successful.

Please download and email this book to every prospective and new puppy owner that you know in order to help spread the word that Puppyhood is the Time to Rescue Adult Shelter Dogs.

http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/you-get-your-puppy

 

3 thoughts on “Before you get your puppy”

  1. I don’t think my original comment went through…here it is again, sorry if I’m repeating myself:

    Well, he had me till the last line about puppyhood being the time rescue adult shelter dogs. Not sure what he means since the article is about getting a new puppy, but i am so tired of this pressure on people to “rescue” a dog, rather than buy from a breeder. There is no longer a pet overpopulation problem, but apart from that, why would anyone get a mixed breed of unknown background, but most likely a behavioral issue, rather than a carefully bred, healthy purebred, no matter what breed. People puff up with moral superiority attitude and look down their noses at my gorgeous (intact) purebred Gordon and Irish Setters. Well, since you have no idea what breed is in your rescue dog, let’s hope it’s not one that doesn’t really get along with people, or has aggression issues, because that really wouldn’t be good for your two-year-old. I have dogs for companionship, not a pat on the back. OK, done venting, thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Well, he had me till the last line about puppyhood being the time rescue adult shelter dogs. Not sure what he means since the article is about getting a new puppy, but I am so tired of this pressure on people to “rescue” a dog, rather than buy from a breeder. There is no longer a pet overpopulation problem, but apart from that, why would anyone get a mixed breed of unknown background, but most likely a behavioral issue, rather than a carefully bred, healthy purebred, no matter what breed. People puff up with moral superiority attitude and look down their noses at my gorgeous (intact) purebred Gordon and Irish Setters. Well, since you have no idea what breed is in your rescue dog, let’s hope it’s not one that doesn’t really get along with people, or has aggression issues, because that really wouldn’t be good for your two-year-old. I have dogs for companionship, not a pat on the back. OK, done venting, thank you.

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