Tag Archives: breed type

The Substantial Gordon

Here it is! The second in a series of articles by our Guest Blogger – Barbara Manson, Stoughton WI. Once again Barb shares insight about the Gordon Setter breed standard helping us to to put the words of the standard into perspective as it pertains to the many “styles” of Gordon we encounter.

The Substantial Gordon

Barbara Manson - photo by Silvia Timmermann 2014 GSCA National Specialty
Barbara Manson – photo by Silvia Timmermann 2014 GSCA National Specialty

by Barbara Manson

I want these articles to follow some kind of natural progression in regards to the way we normally assess our Gordons.  Once again, I’m targeting primarily the folks new to the sport but I hope everyone takes the time to read through this.  It is my intention to  provide a basis for later discussion and for mentoring our “newbies”.

If you asked anyone in Gordons to define substance, the conversation would always begin with bone.  This is the easiest part of substance to see.   Often we tend to look at big feet and the size of the forelegs and compare our dog, who seems well endowed, to a competitors dog who is smaller and who doesn’t appear to have as much as our boy does.  But, let’s stand back for a minute and really evaluate each dog rather than comparing them.  When evaluating the amount of bone, you have to take into consideration the size of the dog you are looking at.  Our standard describes “a good sized, sturdily built black and tan dog, well muscled, with plenty of bone and substance”.  I discussed size a couple of months ago and we know, as per standard, the boys can range from 24-27 inches at the withers and bitches can be 23-26 inches.  Those animals at the bottom of the standard are every bit as correct as those at the top and no preference as to size is stated in the standard.  Therefore, a 24 inch boy and a 23 inch girl are considered “good sized” in terms of height.  It would logically seem that the size of the feet and limbs on a 24 inch dog would not be what you would expect to see on a 27 inch dog.  By standing back and evaluating the individual, you get a better perspective.  Does the smaller dog look like his bone is big for his height?  Perhaps, the impression you get by evaluating in this manner will leave you with the feeling he has more bone than your own dog.  The amount of bone an individual dog has should always be evaluated in proportion to his height.  Here’s another point related to bone we need to consider.  In most species, there are gender differences as to size between males and females.  This, per standard, is also relevant to to Gordon Setters.  In other words, dogs should look like dogs and bitches should look like bitches.  In our breeding, we all will occasionally get a dog who looks a bit “bitchy” or a bitch who looks “doggy”.  We should not be striving for either.  One should know instantly whether he is looking at a dog or bitch without feeling for testicles.  The girls should never be expected to carry as much bone or head as their male counterparts, or vice versa.  The head piece should, first and foremost always fit the body.  I admit to personally being a sucker for a feminine Gordon head on the girls.

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This dog is bred by Debbie Cournoyer, NY. Photo by Lisa Croft-Elliot was used in a book published in the UK. Gordon Setter by Lavonia Harper.

The standard describes “plenty of bone and substance”.  So what constitutes substance.  There are several descriptive words and phrases in the standard that are meant to give the impression of substance.  “Weight for males 55-80 pounds; females 45-70 pounds.  The weight-height ratio make him heavier than the other setters.”  Nowhere in the standard does it say the Gordon is the tallest of the setters.  In fact, the “ideal” height for a male Irish Setter is 27 inches at the shoulder, which is considered the top of the range for a Gordon.  It follows that the impression of size in Gordons must come from other factors.  So what are these factors?  Once again, we look to the standard.

Body
“Body – short from shoulder to hips.  Chest – deep and not too broad in front; the ribs well sprung, leaving plenty of lung room.  The chest reaches to the elbows.  A pronounced forechest is in evidence.  Loins short and broad and not arched.”

Forequarters
“The angle formed by the shoulder blade and upper arm bone is approximately 90 degrees when the dog is standing so the foreleg is perpendicular to the ground.  Forelegs – big boned, straight and not bowed.  Pasterns are strong, short and nearly vertical with a slight spring.”

Hindquarters
“The hind legs from hip to hock are long, flat and muscular; from hock to heel, short and strong.”
The short body (short back) not only gives the impression of strength, but is a stronger back, less likely to breakdown over time.  As our dogs age, top lines tend to sag.  This is especially prevalent in a longer backed dog.  If we are using our Gordon in the field as they were intended, or for performance events, we want them to be sound into old age.

When viewing the dog from the side we should see a pronounced fore-chest.  This is the 90 degree angle formed from the top of the shoulder blade (scapula) or withers, to the upper arm (humerus) to the back or point of the elbow.  The upper arm should be approximately the same length as the shoulder blade, allowing for the front legs to be set well under the body with the elbow in an approximate line with the top of the wither.  The angle formed, ideally, should be about 90 degrees (please reference the drawing).  The front structure is one of those characteristics that defines a setter and sets them apart from other pointing breeds.  Hence, it is also very important to breed type.  I hope to discuss this further in the future.  The more front angle you have, the more the appearance of substance.  In the conformation ring, you may not be able to discern exactly how much fore-chest a dog has without putting your hands on him.  Skillful trimming can give him the illusion of more front, even when he doesn’t have enough.

The loin is the portion of the topline from the last rib to the sacral vertebrae or the area encompassing the lumbar vertebrae.  When viewed from the top, it should appear broad and substantial.  From the side, it should be relatively short.  The body should be deep, with brisket, or body, reaching to the elbow.  There should be sufficient spring of rib so the dogs body, when viewed from over the top, has dimension and definition, and does not appear as a long narrow tube.  When looking from the top, you should be able to see where the ribs end and there should be an indentation where the loin begins.  The tube look is often referred to as “slab sided” and is a look far too common in Gordons.  A breeder friend once referred to dogs like this as “cardboard cut out dogs”.  I found this very descriptive.

Short pasterns and short hocks are indicative stamina and not speed.  Compare the length of the hock in a Gordon to that of a sight hound such as the whippet or greyhound which were bred for speed.

Short pasterns and short hocks are indicative of stamina and not speed.  Compare the length of the hock in a Gordon to that of a sight hound such as the whippet or greyhound which were bred for speed.  We often hear the term wide thigh when referring to Gordon structure.  When viewed from the side, the thigh muscle should look “wide” and developed and when viewed from the back, we should see muscle definition on an adult, conditioned dog.  In general, when comparing Gordons to other breeds of setters, they should appear to have shorter, thicker musculature which leaves the impression of endurance rather than speed and this is most apparent in the rear muscling.  These shorter, thicker muscles require a heavier structure or frame for muscle attachment, hence we should see more bone on a Gordon than on an Irish who has longer, thinner muscles and a longer hock.  Both of these features are indicative of more speed.
The descriptions above are applicable to adult dogs and not necessarily to pups and adolescents.  If you are just getting started in this sport with a young show pup, be aware that it takes time for the youngsters to fully mature and accurate assessments are sometimes difficult, if not impossible on babies.  Also know that none of our dogs are perfect.  This information is intended to improve our understanding of the ideal and give us a basis for evaluating our breeding stock as well as sizing up the competition at the show.

Once again I encourage any feedback or clarification you may have to offer on this subject.  I want to encourage everyone to be involved in breeder education and your comments are welcome.  Please have them to Sue Drum by October 12th for the November News.

(If you are not a GSCA member or would prefer, you may enter your comments here on the blog as these will also be reviewed along with those submitted through the club venue.)

Barb Manson
Kilernan@yahoo.com.

NEWS FLASH – Gordon Setter Students & Mentors

I started a new discussion group that you may find totally useful if you’re seriously into breeding and/or competing with your Gordon Setter. Now, I realize that many of you are not on Facebook and may well have sworn never to go there BUT you don’t have to turn into a Facebook junkie, nor do you need to accumulate a slathering of friends, but you will need to set up a Facebook account in order to view and post to the group.  There are already fabulous discussions starting, questions being posed, and pictures being shared of dogs from way back, all things educational can be shared here.

Here is the link Gordon Setter Students & Mentors click here if you’d care to check it out or join the group.

Gordon Setter Students & Mentors

Description

Welcome Gordon Setter students and mentors! This group is meant to serve as a resource and learning tool for Gordon Setter fanciers who are serious students or experienced breeder/exhibitors willing to join forces where everyone can learn about and mentor the art of breeding better Gordon Setters. A place also to fine tune our skill and expertise when competing in conformation, performance or field events. Topics might include such things as genetics, structure, pedigrees, ancestors, health, and proper care, grooming, as well as training tips pertaining to competition in conformation, performance and field events. To make the most of this forum you are encouraged to submit questions, content and photos to provide examples as well as actively participate in discussions with helpful answers and guiding principles.

Things to keep in mind:

No personal attacks, ridicule, or harassment on or about another member’s post. You will be removed from the group and blocked. We don’t always need to agree and various opinions on a topic are encouraged to promote a learning environment, however remember when you are expressing an opinion to please do so in a tactful and polite manner.

Since this group is meant to serve educational purposes only, please do not submit your win photos and brags, we do love to see those and are very happy for you, but let’s post them on other forums to maintain focus here. The same would be true of those happy Gordon photos we post just for fun.

Please focus on the positive traits of any dog pictured. If you have constructive criticism always be considerate and tactful in your comments to ensure you are providing encouragement as well as an educational experience for the student. Please do share educational articles and links to other sites that will educate and promote better breeding and competition practices.

No SPAM or ads to promote the sale of merchandise or dogs. Spammers will be removed.

No personal attacks on other members! We are here to help each other learn and we will respect everyone and treat each other with dignity because of our differences, a different view could be where a new learning begins.

Enjoy!
Sally Gift, Mesa AZ
Photo by Bob Segal – 2015 GSCA National Specialty

Style Versus Breed Type

Barbara Manson - photo by Silvia Timmermann 2014 GSCA National Specialty
Barbara Manson – photo by Silvia Timmermann 2014 GSCA National Specialty

A warm Welcome for Guest Blogger – Barbara Manson of Stoughton, WI who has been breeding and exhibiting Gordon Setters for…well…forever!  (Ok, maybe she’s not quite that old!) Getting back to the business at hand though, today we offer part one of a series she’s penning. This is also published in the GSCA Newsletter, August issue.

Style Versus Breed Type

by Barbara Manson

How many times have you been ringside and heard someone say “I can’t believe that dog won!  He doesn’t have any breed type!” or “That dog really is typey.” and you don’t agree?  Have you ever wondered about the validity of these comments?  Are these folks really critiquing breed type or the style of the dog in question?  Understanding this is particularly difficult for the newbie who has no experiences to draw from.  For the purpose of our discussion, and opening our eyes to other breeders accomplishments, we need to define exactly what is style and what is breed type.

Barb Manson judging
Photo by Silvia Timmermann 2014 GSCA National Specialty Puppy Sweeps judging.

So let’s talk style.  Certainly, all the dogs in the ring don’t look alike.  How can they when for one thing, our standard says dogs can be 24-27 inches at the withers and bitches can be 23-26 inches.  Imagine looking down the line at a group of 27 inch boys and seeing a dog in the middle of the group who is 25 inches tall.  As little as one inch can make a very big difference in the way a dog appears.  That picture alone would evoke a “not very typey” comment from many exhibitors.  Let me challenge you with this thought.  Doesn’t this dog’s size conform to the standard for Gordon Setters?  There is not a word in the written standard that gives preference to a particular size, as long as the dog falls within the described parameters.  So what is it that makes this dog less correct in the middle of the standard and the one at the top more correct?  If you were to closely examine that 25 inch dog, you may find he has several attributes that definitely define him as a Gordon Setter, but many of these points are in proportion to his size.  This is an example of personal preference or style and not type.  Another example of style can be differences in heads and expression.  Many times, when you closely examine heads, and are being completely honest with yourself, you can see examples that are both pleasing and in line with the standard but they are not what you have become accustomed to looking at.  That does not mean one or the other are incorrect.  Just different and someone else’s interpretation of the standard.

So what is breed type?  All of those characteristics discussed in the standard define the essence of the Gordon Setter.  Some of them are found in many standards for breeds not even in the sporting group.  Some are common to many sporting breeds.  Some are unique to the setters and others only to Gordons.  No other standard has this combination of characteristics, only Gordon Setters.  Therefore, they all contribute to breed type and true breed type lies in how closely our dogs conform to the standard.  We will be discussing some of these characteristics in detail at a later time.

breed-style 3
Photo by Bob Segal 2015 GSCA National Specialty

We have several specialties coming up.  If you go, I’m encouraging you to take time to watch dogs other than your own, especially some of the adult classes.  When viewing the dogs stacked, do they look like all the parts fit smoothly together and when on the move, is the gait easy, free flowing and efficient.  Take note of the head pieces and expressions.  Note the differences in the dogs.  Are they a matter of style or breed type?  I’m leaving you with one question to explore as our discussions continue.  Does breed type effect style?   I’m including the breed standard so you can easily reference it in the upcoming months.  I will be allowing a month between articles for comments from our membership.  Educating others through our insights and experiences is important to the preservation and improvement of our breed.  I hope you will all participate.  Comments will be due to our News Editor by September 12th.  You may also feel free to e-mail me as well.

Barb Manson, Stoughton, WI
kilernan@yahoo.com

GORDON SETTER BREED STANDARD click this link to read

Photo by Bob Segal 2015 GSCA National Specialty
Photo by Bob Segal 2015 GSCA National Specialty

Preferred Breed Type – Why the Stand-out Dog Can Be a Loser!

… “Ask Yourself These Questions”

  • Why do breeder judges put dogs with handlers when they know the animal does not represent breed excellence?
  • Why do handlers accept such dogs knowing once they finish, they will be “petted out”?
  • Are you kennel blind and do you breed to standard?
  • Should breeders and newcomers read the standard prior to stud and bitch selection?
  • When will more mentors open up to newcomers?
  • And lastly, are “gas money” and “filler” dogs destroying our sport?

Today we share a link to an article Preferred Breed Type: Why the Stand-Out Dog Can Be a Loser! written by Edna “Katie” Gammil, it can apply to any breed, including our Gordon Setter. Good food for thought concerning breed type and common trends in breeds, raising issues that every serious breeder should consider as we’re making our breeding choices.

Photo by Bob Segal 2015 North Country Specialty
Photo by Bob Segal
2015 North Country Specialty

Katie writes…When “current type” does not equal correctness, the best dog can lose because in many rings, the fatal flaw is being a stand-out.  A dog show friend, absent from the sport for several years, attended some local shows with me. Welcoming the opportunity to view dogs in general after her sabbatical, she became visually distressed. Her despair increased when a “less than average” class dog received BOB. The waning quality in her beautiful breed breaks her heart. She stated it would be wasted effort to show a dog correct to the standard today, as some judges feel compelled to award dogs conforming to the majority of the entries.” 

Observing other breeds, she remarks on the lack of neck, restricted front movement and the lack of rear follow through; we discuss “gay tails” and breed type variances. We watch faulty movement and see coats dragging the ground. Weak pasterns and sickle hocks complete the picture. She wonders what causes this to happen to functional dogs in such a short time. It seems the correct dogs have fallen victim to what one may refer to as the “Perfection of Mediocrity”.   Read the entire article by clicking here…

Preferred Breed Type: Why the Stand-Out Dog Can Be a Loser! by Katie Gammil

Photos by Bob Segal from the 2015 North Country Specialty.

Photos are for your viewing pleasure and are not intended to illustrate any point related to this article.

Photo by Bob Segal 2015 North Country Specialty
Photo by Bob Segal
2015 North Country Specialty

Judging the Gordon Setter – Gary Andersen

Thank you to our Guest Blogger – Gary L. Andersen for sharing this article with us regarding judging of the Gordon Setter in conformation.

About Gary L. Andersen – Scottsdale, AZ

GaryI have been involved with Gordon Setters since 1972 along with my wife Beverly. We have owned and shown all four Setters, English Cockers and Smooth Fox Terriers. I have been judging Gordon Setters since 1993. I am now AKC licensed to judge BIS, Sporting and Non-Sporting groups, two hounds and three working breeds. I serve as the Judge’s Education Chairman for the Gordon Setter Club of America and was instrumental in starting the Sporting Dog Association of Arizona for whom I now serve as President. I am the past president of Scottsdale Dog Fanciers and currently serve on the Board of Directors of the Gordon Setter Club of America and the Sun County Terrier Club.

JUDGING THE GORDON SETTER

When judging the Gordon Setter remember it is the heaviest of the four setters, having more bone and body. They are a sturdy built well muscled, with plenty of bone and substance. Gordon Setters are a single person hunting dog. They have a unique front movement. The other three setters are used more for open field work, the Gordon work heavier brush and because of this, the front legs lift up and then fold back at the pasterns so the feet do not get caught in the brush.

Look for a black and tan dog with plenty of substance and is good-sized. Active, upstanding and stylish, capable of doing a full day’s work in the field their appearance suggesting strength and stamina rather than speed.   Gordon Setters are equally at home as companions dogs, obedience, agility, field competitors and show dogs. The head is fairly heavy and finely chiseled. His bearing is intelligent, noble and dignified, showing no signs of shyness or aggressiveness. Clear colors and either a wavy or straight coat are acceptable. A dog of well balance in all points is preferred to one with outstanding good qualities and defects. A smooth, free movement with high head carriage is typical. Many of the words used in this description are taken from the official AKC standard.

The suggested height is 24 to 27 inches for a male and 23 to 26 inches for a female. This is a wide scale. You can have females and males of the same size in the ring, a 24 inch male with the substance of the Gordon is as good as a 27 inch dog. You may see dogs over 27 inches and our standard says that as long as the proportions are correct, it is ok. To me, going below our standard is more of a fault than going over. A 22 inch female is getting into the Spaniel size. Dogs should weigh 55 to 80 pounds and bitches 45 to 70 pounds. Again showing the substance of our breed. We want our breed shown in field condition, hard muscles not overly fat or under weight as this hinders the working ability. Again, the weight to height ratio makes him heavier than the other setters. The proportion of the Gordon should be square when measured from the fore-chest to the back of the thigh verses withers to the ground. The English and Irish Setters are slightly longer than tall.

The head should be deep rather than broad, we do not want an elegant head. The eyes are dark brown, the darker the better, good-sized, oval rather than round and not deep-set, nor bulging. The eye rims should be tight and pigmented. The ears are set low on the head, preferably on the line of the eye, they are fairly thin and large, well folded and carried close to the head. The skull is widest between the ears, nicely rounded and good-sized. There should be a clearly indicated stop. The muzzle is fairly long, not pointed either as seen from above or to the side. The muzzle should be fifty percent of the length of the head and should be parallel to the line of the skull. The flew should not be pendulous. The nose should be broad with open nostrils and black in color. Snow nose is very common and should not be penalized. The lip line from the nose to the flew shows a sharp, well-defined square contour. A strong under-jaw also helps fill out the muzzle so as to avoid a snippy muzzle. A scissor bite is preferred, but a level bite is not a fault.

The neck should be long, arched and lean flowing into the shoulders. The throat should be as dry as possible. The neck must be long enough to pick up the downed game and bring it back to the shooter. The topline should straight with a moderate slope to it. The body should be short from shoulders to hips. The Chest is deep reaching to the elbows, but not too broad to hinder the front leg movement. The ribs should be well sprung and long to allow room for heart and lungs. There should be a pronounced fore-chest. The loin is short, strong and broad with no arch. The croup is nearly flat with a slight slope to the tail-set. The tail is thick at the root finishing in a fine point and should reach to the hock. The placement of the tail is important for correct carriage. The placement is judged in relationship to the structure of the croup. The tail is also a barometer to temperament.

The shoulders should lay well back. The tops of the shoulders should be close together. When viewed from the behind the neck should flow into the shoulders in smooth line and gradually widen from neck to shoulder. The angle of the shoulder-blade and upper arm should be 90 degrees. The front legs should be straight and well boned, not bowed, with the elbows not turning in or out. The pasterns are short, strong nearly straight with a slight spring. Dewclaws may be removed. Catlike feet with well arched toes with plenty of hair between them and full toe pads. The feet do not turn in or out.

The hind legs are long from hip to hock, flat and muscular. The hock is short and strong when standing they should be perpendicular. The stifle and hock joints should be well bent and not turned in or out. The feet are the same as the front.

The coat should be long and straight, a wave is permissible, but not curls. The hair will be the longest on the ears, under stomach and on the chest. The tail feathering is long at the root and tapers to the tip forming a triangular appearance.

Considering color when judging, the Gordon is primarily a black dog with tan markings, which can be a rich chestnut or mahogany shade. This color can go from a very light chestnut to a very dark mahogany. Black penciling on the toes is allowed. The borderline between the colors should be clearly defined. There should not be tan hairs in the black. The tan markings are as follows: 1. Two clear spots above the eyes, not over ¾ of an inch in diameter. 2. On the sides of the muzzle, which should not reach the top of the muzzle from one side to the other.   3. On the throat. 4. Two large clear sports on the chest, (looks like a bow-tie). However on a darker dog these spots may appear to be a darker brown, this is acceptable. 5. On the inside of the hind legs showing down the front of the stifle and broadening out to the outside of the hind legs from the hocks to the toes. It should not completely eliminate the black on the back side of the hind legs.   6. On the forelegs from the corpus or a little above downward to the toes. 7. Around the vent. 8. A white spot on the chest is allowed, the smaller the better. This is the only disqualification for the Gordon; Predominantly tan, red or buff dogs.

A bold strong driving free-swinging gait is desired. The head is carried up and the tail is constantly flagging while the dog is in motion, as mentioned earlier, this is a barometer to temperament as well as his “rudder”. He should be straight coming and going with reach and drive on the side gait. The overall appearance of the moving dog is one smooth-flowing, well-balanced rhythm, in which the action is pleasing to the eye, effortless, economical, harmonious and powerful.

The Gordon Setter is alert, gay, interested and confident. He is fearless and willing, intelligent and capable. He is loyal and affectionate, yet is strong-minded enough to stand the rigors of training. They are slow maturing, so sometimes this doesn’t show up early in life. The field trainer that we used always left our Gordon Setters in the puppy class until they were over two years of age.

In 2002 the Gordon Setter Club of America put the 100 point scale back into our standard. It is as follows:

Head and neck, eyes/ears                            10

Body                                                                  15

Shoulders, forelegs/feet                               10

Hind legs/feet                                                 10

Tail                                                                     5

Coat                                                                  8

Color/markings                                               10

Temperament                                                 10

Size/general appearance                              15

Gait                                                                    12

Some points to remember when judging the Gordon Setter:

  • Inch per pound the Gordon is the biggest Setter.
  • Should have a deep head with a squared off muzzle.
  • Muzzle perpendicular to back skull.
  • Topline is a smooth line from the back of the skull to the tail set.
  • No sharp angles.
  • Square dog.
  • The dog is to be shown in field weight and muscular.
  • Must be black and tan.
  • Large boned.
  • Smooth and powerful moving.
  • Style plus soundness equals TYPE.
  • It takes the sum of the whole dog or the complete standard to make the ideal Gordon Setter.

Gary L. Andersen

Success in Show Dogs: Breed Type Is Flexible, Not Liquid

Thank you to our Guest Blogger – Barbara Manson for sharing this excellent article for breeder/exhibitor regarding the oft debated issue of type.

From Dog Channel we bring you  Success in Show Dogs: Breed Type Is Flexible, Not Liquid.

Share this site with your friends…email…word of mouth…we’re all serious Gordon Setter lovers here, sharing information!

Photo by Silvia Timmerman

(This article contains photos that are not intended nor do they relate to the content of the article.)

It’s the learning that’s important! The 2015 GSCA National Specialty

JUST SAYIN – you don’t want to miss the excitement and the learning opportunities at the most anticipated event in our breed, the GSCA 2015 National Specialty. With this year’s convenient location in the heart of America the geographic location for the 2015 National allows folks from both coasts a more equal opportunity to make the trek. I’m expecting to see the very best in competition at this event with fabulous dogs from all corners of the U.S.

All aspects of the 2015 GSCA National Specialty will be held at Purina Farms’ state-of-the-art  Event Center.  Purina Farms is a short, 40 minute drive from downtown St. Louis, MO.”

BOB 14 NationalYou’ll never find an opportunity to see as many fabulous Gordon Setters if you limit yourself to attending only local All Breed Shows and Specialties. In my opinion, you cannot fully develop successful breeding programs if you don’t know the competition’s best attributes. What better place to learn those attributes than by seeing them in the flesh at the National? (Notice I’m not mentioning finding their faults? That’s because I believe relying primarily on fault judging of your competitors dogs will be the fastest method you can employ to failure.) Yes, we must know the faults but breeding decisions should be based on strengths. You’ll never find a better place to view the strengths of so many other Gordon Setters if you don’t take the time to actually see them at their very best, in competition, in the ring, in the flesh.

If you are a serious exhibitor/breeder attending the National Specialty is the most versatile learning opportunity you can give to yourself. It is here that you’ll broaden your view of Gordon Setter type, style and structure. Your knowledge of the breed will broaden merely by sitting ringside to watch the judging. Ringside is where it’s at people, as this is there where you’re certain to see every example of Gordon Setter, and often multiple generations of Gordon Setters from breeding kennels all over the US, Canada and sometimes beyond. Seeing is learning, nothing can replace that for the serious breeder.

Are performance events like Obedience, Agility and Rally your thing? Well then why would you miss this chance to meet others who face the same challenges and successes that you’ve encounter with your Gordon Setter? The people you’ll meet at the National competing in performance events are your best source of training methods that work the well with our breed. Why would you deny yourself the chance to meet others like yourself involved in your breed, the Gordon Setter, to share knowledge and training methods? Ask any good trainer how they “got their dog to do that” and they’ll be sure to share.

Agility jumpIf you’re serious, really serious, about breeding or training Gordon Setters you’ll not find a better opportunity to sharpen your skills and learn, learn, learn.

It’s not about going to the National to win, it’s about winning through learning! Hope to see you there!

Sally Gift, Mesa AZ

2015 Gordon Setter Club of America National Specialty 

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