Tag Archives: Gordon Setter

Estimating the breeding value of a dog

There are so many moving parts when it comes to breeding a litter of Gordon Setters that sometimes folks find themselves staring blankly, like a deer in headlights not knowing what to do, where to go, and who to believe. For many Gordon Setter expert breeders the final decision is going to come down to the pedigree, who were the ancestors of the proposed stud dog and brood bitch, and do they have the qualities being sought in the breeding?

Ivy litterWell, I just read an article that reminded me once again of the importance of pedigree and introduced relatively new terminology to me. There is also mention within about the possibility of a new tool for the serious breeder. Follow the link to “Estimating the breeding value of a dog” and post your comments below, we’d like to know what you think.

Thanks for dropping in folks…hope to catch you back here with us again soon!

Estimating the breeding value of a dog – The Institute of Canine Biology.

Photo by Laurie Ward

(This article contains photos that are not intended nor do they relate to the content of the article.)

Lifelong Immunity – Why Vets Are Pushing Back

I remember 1978 when we breeders thought vaccinating our dogs every year was a must do item because that was the current veterinary protocol. I had several Gordon Setters living with me back then and would buy the vaccines online or through my local vet and administer myself. Paying $40 – $50 for each dog to visit the vet every year as opposed to $3 or so for the vaccine was a “no brainer” that allowed me to pocket those dollars for vet visits related to injuries and sickness as opposed to well-doggie exams.

By the time statements like this “Dr. Schultz concludes:  “Vaccines for diseases like distemper and canine parvovirus, once administered to adult animals, provide lifetime immunity.”  “Are we vaccinating too much?” JAVMA, No. 4, August 15, 1995, pg. 421” went public it was apparent to me that what we had been practicing in order to keep our Gordon Setters safe, was instead perhaps harmful, and I dropped those re-vaccination practices.  Of course changing my behavior so radically wasn’t easy, this was a radical change, however using antibody titers to monitor immunity on my Gordons over the past decade has a addressed the anxiety, no adult has required a booster.

If you’re thinking that more is better, that you must continue to provide booster shots for the life of your Gordon, reading this article Lifelong Immunity – Why Vets Are Pushing Back | Dogs Naturally Magazine  may give you food for thought.

Sally Gift

Photo by Amy Baitinger

(This article contains photos that are not intended nor do they relate to the content of the article.)

It’s the learning that’s important! The 2015 GSCA National Specialty

JUST SAYIN – you don’t want to miss the excitement and the learning opportunities at the most anticipated event in our breed, the GSCA 2015 National Specialty. With this year’s convenient location in the heart of America the geographic location for the 2015 National allows folks from both coasts a more equal opportunity to make the trek. I’m expecting to see the very best in competition at this event with fabulous dogs from all corners of the U.S.

All aspects of the 2015 GSCA National Specialty will be held at Purina Farms’ state-of-the-art  Event Center.  Purina Farms is a short, 40 minute drive from downtown St. Louis, MO.”

BOB 14 NationalYou’ll never find an opportunity to see as many fabulous Gordon Setters if you limit yourself to attending only local All Breed Shows and Specialties. In my opinion, you cannot fully develop successful breeding programs if you don’t know the competition’s best attributes. What better place to learn those attributes than by seeing them in the flesh at the National? (Notice I’m not mentioning finding their faults? That’s because I believe relying primarily on fault judging of your competitors dogs will be the fastest method you can employ to failure.) Yes, we must know the faults but breeding decisions should be based on strengths. You’ll never find a better place to view the strengths of so many other Gordon Setters if you don’t take the time to actually see them at their very best, in competition, in the ring, in the flesh.

If you are a serious exhibitor/breeder attending the National Specialty is the most versatile learning opportunity you can give to yourself. It is here that you’ll broaden your view of Gordon Setter type, style and structure. Your knowledge of the breed will broaden merely by sitting ringside to watch the judging. Ringside is where it’s at people, as this is there where you’re certain to see every example of Gordon Setter, and often multiple generations of Gordon Setters from breeding kennels all over the US, Canada and sometimes beyond. Seeing is learning, nothing can replace that for the serious breeder.

Are performance events like Obedience, Agility and Rally your thing? Well then why would you miss this chance to meet others who face the same challenges and successes that you’ve encounter with your Gordon Setter? The people you’ll meet at the National competing in performance events are your best source of training methods that work the well with our breed. Why would you deny yourself the chance to meet others like yourself involved in your breed, the Gordon Setter, to share knowledge and training methods? Ask any good trainer how they “got their dog to do that” and they’ll be sure to share.

Agility jumpIf you’re serious, really serious, about breeding or training Gordon Setters you’ll not find a better opportunity to sharpen your skills and learn, learn, learn.

It’s not about going to the National to win, it’s about winning through learning! Hope to see you there!

Sally Gift, Mesa AZ

2015 Gordon Setter Club of America National Specialty 

2015_gsca_logo

The Breeder— Endangered?

I recently read an excellent article representing many of my own thoughts and concerns regarding the plight of the purebred dog and purebred dog breeder. While the Gordon Setter has never reached the popularity of breeds like the Doberman, Gordon Setter breeders are sharing that same fate of losing the future and integrity of our breed through the loss of new and younger breeders to take the reins and carry the breed forward.

I too believe the promotion of rescuing mixed breed dogs has had a harsh and alarming effect on the future of all purebred dogs that only breeders can change by challenging that propaganda . We must get back to promoting the purpose bred purebred dog as the best resource for a reliable source of quality companion dogs with dependable, predictable, and stable temperaments and physical characteristics.

I hope you’ll take the time to read the AKC Dog Lovers article The Doberman Breeder—An Endangered Species? | AKC Dog Lovers and share you own comments with us regarding whether the rescue fad of adopting mixed breeds has hurt breeders and how we can better promote our Gordon Setter and the breeders dedicated to preserving and improving our breed?

Sally Gift

Photo by Silvia Timmerman

(This article contains photos that are not intended nor do they relate to the content of the article.)

Books about breeding that are not X-rated!

Once I was young, naive and considered crazy by my family. Well, actually my family considered me crazy for a number of reasons, but to stay on topic the one I’m referring to here was my desire to breed show dogs, Gordon Setter show dogs to be exact. What was I thinking?

I digress, you see what I wanted to share with you today was the book that became my “dog breeding bible” way back when we all “walked a mile to school, barefoot through the snow”. And, if you’re too young to have heard your parents (or grandparents for some of you) say that, you’re probably too young to be witnessing sex between dogs so perhaps you should skip on out of here.

Back in 1980 a fine lady by the name of Ann Serrane authored this fantastic book called “The Joy of Breeding your own Show Dog”. I read that book from cover to cover so many times I’ve memorized whole chapters. I kept that book next to the whelping box every time I had a litter (no, you don’t want to know what the stains were from on some of the pages). Ann’s book starts at the beginning, before you’ve bred the bitch, and covers everything from simple genetics and pedigrees through whelping the puppies and caring for fragile newborns. Ann taught me so many things, like the importance of knowing the traits of the dogs in the pedigree to other life saving things like using a glucose solution to rehydrate newborns to keep them strong so they could nurse. She taught me when to call the vet and what that vet would really need to know. (Told you I memorized whole chapters!)

Joy of Breeding Show dog

I’ve read several other books about breeding dogs, but they just weren’t as useful to me, some were missing information that Anne had included, others were not as clearly written, and very few offered me new ideas or concepts.  I don’t know, must have been a first love sort of thing, but no book ever quite replaced this one for me.

There was a reprint of this book and I’ve found used copies online, I’ve seen it at dog shows and have even found a site where it can be downloaded – though I’m not seeing the fun in having an electronic copy that can’t be left around for a few puppies to chew.

So, now that I’ve gotten that off my chest how about you all share with us!

What’s your favorite book about breeding dogs? Do you have one? Who wrote it and why did you use it?

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