Tag Archives: learning

Grooming – Gordon Setter Videos

Oster ProfessionalOster  has offered many best selling grooming products for many years and are especially known for their animal clippers. Now they’re offering even more help and support for the self groomer via their website where they’ve posted very helpful video clips demonstrating how to groom several breeds. For us that includes the Gordon Setter. How wonderful is that? Here are all the links to their videos…happy tails to you all!

Sally Gift, Mesa AZ                                                                                  Photos by Ben Perez

14 Videos about grooming a Gordon Settter13173347_178245152575572_8841807142114207002_o

Face & Skull – Gordon Setter

Face & Muzzle – Gordon Setter

Face & Eye – Gordon Setter

Face & Ear – Gordon Setter

Body & Neck – Gordon Setter

Body – Gordon Setter

Body 2nd Time over – Gordon Setter

Body 3rd time over – Gordon Setterjuly

Front Leg & Legs – Gordon Setter

Legs & Front Foot – Gordon Setter

Rear leg – Gordon Setter

Rear Foot – Gordon Setter

Tail – Gordon Setter

 

Recap Complete – Gordon SetterJuly3

Nail Grinder – How to use

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Photo by Bob Segal

Why are European Dogs So Well Behaved?

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Why Are European Dogs So Well Behaved?

Dogs, Euro Style

By Kama Brown CPDT-KA, January 2017

Together we will build a resource

“Together we will build an interactive, searchable resource for the Gordon Setter Fancier” – Sally Gift

I have been asked by some GSCA members about the origins of the Gordon Setter Expert and, in talking to them, learned that there are many misconceptions about why I developed it. Gordon Setter Expert started because as chair of the GSCA Breeder Education committee, I heard from members expressing the need for a web based resource and communication tool for not only member owners and breeders, but all Gordon Setter fanciers. My intent, therefore, was to create a blog which was to be owned and hosted by the Gordon Setter Club of America, Inc. and managed by a team of GSCA member-expertsI called this blog Gordon Setter Expert because I envisioned the content would be contributed by the hundreds of Gordon Setter experts among GSCA ranks. I purposely used the word Expert as a word to draw non-GSCA members, to gain trust, to attract Gordon lovers to our resource and to the Gordon Setter Club of America. I hoped to illustrate, through our web presence, the value of being a member of the GSCA.

My proposed prototype for this blog was sent to the GSCA Board of Governors for approval in January of 2015, where that necessary approval stalemated. Understanding then that some on the Board at that time did not recognize the value for the breed as well as the club, as a labor of love for our Gordon Setter breed, I decided to launch this blog on my own, as a personal contribution to the breed and their owners. I believed then, and continue to believe today in this blog’s ability to promote, protect and advance the purebred Gordon Setter.

It will always be my hope to someday transfer this blog to the Gordon Setter Club of America, in the hope that my efforts will be accepted and GSCA will carry on the work that has begun here.

Today GSE visitors will find over 250 articles related to breeding, showing, field events, performance events, training and health. Gordon Setter Expert is followed by 2,372 people who receive the new articles by email and other web services. Followers come from all walks of life, from all around the world and include many of the current GSCA membership. I am pleased to see that so many individuals, breed clubs, and parent clubs link to Gordon Setter Expert in order to share this resource with their friends, members and visitors to their websites.

Gordon Setter Expert proposal sent to the GSCA  To read my first proposal to the 2015 GSCA Board to gain their approval and support to create this blog on their behalf click this link.

To learn more about me and GSE click here to read the “About” page

Sally Gift, Mesa AZSundance Logo

Sally at the beach

Please note that the views and opinions expressed on this blog are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Gordon Setter Club of America.

Guide to Genetics Testing

A Clinical Genetics Approach to Understanding
Genetic, Multiplex and Health Testing

Jerold S. Bell, DVM

     The increasing availability of genetic screening tests, DNA tests,
and now multiplex test panels also requires an understanding
of what the tests tell you.       Join us in this webinar and learn:

– The practical applications for using the results of these tests
to improve the health of dogs

– The dangers for the inappropriate use of genetic tests to dog health
– The roles of the breeder, dog owner and veterinarian
in utilizing genetic tests

Running time: 75 mins

Free registration compliments of

Veterinary Professionals can earn CE credit (Approved by AAVSB RACE,
NY State, NJVMA) by logging into VetVine (it’s free to join)
and registering to view the video on this page

AKCCHF – Clinical Genetics & Health Testing

Click the link above to access this video seminar.

 

Before you get your puppy

Published on Dog Star Daily and written by Dr. Ian Dunbar, this free, puppy training booklet is filled with excellent advice and training guidelines for the new puppy owner. It can be easily downloaded from the  site so breeders can share the link with their new puppy owners to prepare them to properly manage the puppy, even before they take that new baby home. All breeders want to give their puppies the best opportunity to develop into the perfect family pet, and this booklet will give you, the breeder, a foundation for helping those new owners create a home and environment to start those pups off on the right foot.

Shared by:  Sally Gift, Mesa AZ

BEFORE YOU GET YOUR PUPPY

This book is simply a MUST READ for anyone thinking of getting a puppy. Puppies should be raised in an errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training set-up.  This is very easy to do and everything you need to know is described in this little book.  Otherwise, if puppies are allowed to eliminate anywhere and chew anything in their kennel, that’s what they’ll continue to do when you bring them home.  Most important, puppies must be socialized before they are three months old.  Preventing fearfulness and aggression is easy and fun whereas trying to resolve adult problems is difficult, time-consuming and not always successful.

Please download and email this book to every prospective and new puppy owner that you know in order to help spread the word that Puppyhood is the Time to Rescue Adult Shelter Dogs.

http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/you-get-your-puppy

 

Rethinking Puppy Socialization

New puppy owners and breeders sending puppies off to their new homes will both benefit from the information in this excellent blog post by Lisa Mullinax.  Click on the title of the article to visit Lisa’s blog for more training advice!

Sally Gift, Mesa AZ

June 30, 2015

Lisa Mullinax, ACDBC

Why does my dog have a behavior problem?  I TOOK him to puppy class!”

I hear this – or variations of this – a lot.  Like, all the time.  In fact, at least half the dogs in my aggression cases have taken a puppy class.  That’s way up from 10-15 years ago.

While more dog owners are aware of the importance of socialization than they used to be, the complex concept of socialization has been boiled down to almost useless sound bytes.  Online articles give generic advice like “Socialization is very important.  Enroll your puppy in a socialization class.”

I taught puppy classes for many years.  And I can say that even the best puppy class provides only about 5% of the socialization that a new puppy needs.

A puppy class is held in just one environment, with one group of people and one group of puppies. Imagine if a child were only exposed to two places – home and the same classroom – for the first 10 years of their life…they would not be a well-socialized child!  Socialization means exposing a puppy to many novel sights, smells, sounds, and surfaces, in as many different environments as safely possible, ensuring a pleasant experience in those environments, especially for (but not limited to) the first 14 weeks of their life, the critical period of socialization.

Basically, be prepared to come home from work and take your puppy on a safe socialization field trip to a new location every day for the first six weeks in your home.  After that, you can drop it to 2-3 days a week until your puppy is at least 5 months old.  Ideally, until your puppy is past the adolescent stage (approx 18 months old).

Seem extreme? I didn’t say these trips have to last for hours. They can be quick trips to the local grocery store parking lot or even sitting on a local park bench (keeping new puppies off the ground) for 10 minutes before heading home.  But you need to do something new every day.

Or, you know, you could wait 6 months and then spend $900 or more to hire a trainer to help you undo your dog’s leash reactivity or stranger-directed aggression.  Totally your choice.

Socialization prepares your puppy for life in your world, which frequently presents unusual and even scary situations.

What is NOT a socialization program:

  • Breeder/rescue having a lot of dogs

  • Having a “friendly” breed

  • Having a puppy who is already friendly

  • Having other dogs at home

  • Having other people at home

  • Introducing a puppy to one dog

  • Taking a six-week puppy class

Just because your puppy is currently friendly to dogs and people now, in your home, or in one or two environments, does not mean you don’t need to provide the same amount of socialization that a more reserved puppy needs.  Not if you want to ensure that your puppy remains friendly.

The more novel experiences your puppy has which result in a positive, pleasant outcome, the more prepared your puppy will be for his or her future life.

Contrary to popular belief, a puppy does not need to make contact with dogs and people for socialization to occur.   This is why you can still provide socialization without putting your puppy at risk.

DO’S AND DON’TS

DO:

  • Carry your puppy into dog-friendly stores (this doesn’t just mean pet stores – you’d be surprised at how many banks and non-dog retail stores are willing to help a responsible owner with socialization).

  • Be generous with rewards.  Cheese. Hot dogs.  Small little tasty bits of meaty, cheesy goodness that accompanies all new and potentially scary experiences.  No, your puppy isn’t going to get fat.

  • Watch new people from a distance – overly-exuberant puppies can learn that they don’t get to greet everyone just because they want to (impulse control – important life skill), and shy puppies can learn that the appearance of strangers does not mean a scary encounter.

  • Carry your puppy into the vet for non-vaccination visits, and the groomer (if your dog will require grooming) for a quick treat without the shampoo.

  • Expose your puppy to other dogs…from your car: Sit in the parking lot of the dog park and let your puppy watch the dogs come and go.

  • Fill a kiddie pool with water bottles, boxes, and other strange objects and let your puppy explore…then repeat this in different areas of your house, in your yard, even on your front porch (if you can safely contain your puppy and prevent him/her from getting on the front lawn).

  • Buy a fun playset with tunnels and tents from your local toy store.  Fill the tunnels with toys and treats to encourage your puppy to explore.

DON’T

  • DON’T ever force your puppy to approach, enter, or interact with anything that they aren’t willingly approaching, entering, or interacting with.  EVER.  Shy puppies sometimes need multiple approaches to work up the courage to interact.  Don’t force it.  If you do, I might just show up on your porch and squirt you in the face with a water bottle.  No!  Bad puppy owner!

  • DON’T place your puppy on dirt or grass in public areas or in back yards where friends/family have lived for less than two years. That’s because viruses like Parvo can live in the soil for that long.

  • DON’T take your puppy to the dog park until they are at least 5-6 months old and have already been socialized to a variety of other dogs.  Dog parks are for socialized dogs, not for socialization.  Being charged, swarmed, knocked over, humped, and generally terrorized is definitely not a positive experience.

  • DON’T let well-meaning strangers overwhelm your puppy with enthusiastic greetings, invasive handling, or their own, special form of training that they claim to have gleaned from dog ownership.

  • DON’T let your puppy meet strange dogs you encounter in public unless you are prepared to embark on a significant behavior modification program.  Relying on a complete stranger to be honest and objective about their dog’s behavior is gambling with your puppy’s safety.

  • DON’T let your friendly puppy get away with murder in the name of socializaation. Part of socialization is learning how to interact with the world.  For confident, friendly puppies, that also means learning good manners around strangers and strange dogs.  Allowing a friendly puppy to treat the world like his mosh pit when he is little is going to make life super fun when he’s 60 lbs.

The best socialization program starts at the breeder or foster home, who introduces puppies to new sights, sounds, surfaces, and smells long before they come home with you.  This breeder provides a fun play area for her puppies:

ADOLESCENT SOCIALIZATION

Starting around 5 months of age, your puppy is going to freak out a little.  Part of this is normal adolescent behavior (oh, and has anyone told you that this is when teething really starts?), but adolescent dogs go through multiple and brief fear periods.  During this time, you’re going to need to renew your socialization efforts.

Here’s the key:  Listen to your dog.  If something is scaring your adolescent dog, the fear is very real to them.  Don’t force the issue just because you know it’s just a statue or garbage can.  Give your dog the distance they need to feel safe, then reintroduce the scary thing from a distance, accompanied by LOTS of great things.  This is where a good trainer can help you.  The goal here is for your dog to learn that a) scary things usually aren’t as bad as they seem and bravery is always rewarded, and b) they can trust you to keep them safe.

YEAH, IT’S A LOT OF WORK…BUT YOU ONLY GET ONE CHANCE TO DO IT RIGHT

Waiting until a puppy has received a full set of vaccinations to begin a socialization program is too little, too late! Socialization begins on Day 1 with you.  The first 8 weeks in your home should be devoted to teaching important life skills that you only get one chance to get right.

Don’t worry about “obedience” training right away, outside of a good name response and recall. A solid down-stay is not going to make for drama-free nail trims or prevent your dog from biting strangers.

Could you skip all this work and still end up with a happy, well-adjusted pet?  Maybe.  But that’s a big – and expensive – risk to take with a 15+ year commitment.

Could you do all this work and still end up with a dog with a behavior problem?  Maybe.  There are a lot of other factors that contribute to aggressive behavior, including genetics (trainers can’t fix your dog’s DNA) and learning history (if a trainer tells you to yank on your dog’s pinch collar every time he sees another dog, he’s got a really good chance of getting cranky when he sees other dogs).

Dog behavior is about risk assessment and management. My recommendations to my clients are designed to minimize the risk that their dog will develop a behavior problem in the future.  There are no guarantees – behavior is not static, it changes and adapts depending on the dog’s needs. Your job is to reduce the odds that your puppy’s behavior changes for the worse.

By doing all this work, you significantly minimize the risk that your dog will develop a problem that could jeopardize his success in your home…or even his life.  If this seems like more work than you can handle, you might not be ready for a puppy.  Check out your local shelter for a nice 4+ year-old dog.  There are no longevity guarantees no matter what age dog you get, so you may as well pick a dog who fits your lifestyle now.  10 years with the right dog for your lifestyle is far better than 15 years with one who doesn’t.

Finally, if your puppy’s veterinarian insists that your puppy stay indoors until they are “fully vaccinated,” find a new veterinarian who is up-to-date on the importance of puppy socialization.

And if a veterinarian or a member of their staff tells you that you must physically manhandle, pin, roll, or shake your puppy to establish dominance, pick up your puppy and RUN out of that office as fast as you can!

The Power of Trust – Mentoring

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Photo by Bob Segal

“Our sport is failing and only we can turn the tide…If our (dog) show world is to survive we absolutely must take on the challenge…” This rings so true to me and that’s what I’m writing about today, what I intend to do for my part to help turn the tide.

I promised myself that I was going to do more, that I would speak out, to help turn the tide in the war against breeders of purebred dogs.

I promised myself I was going to do more to help mentor and teach newcomers to the sport, so I started this blog.

I promised myself I was going to do more to be kind to other breeders, to encourage sportsman like conduct not only in the ring but also in every day-to-day interaction with other breeders and exhibitors.

I promised myself I would treat others in the sport with respect even if, and especially when, I disagreed with their opinion.

I promised myself that I would continue to speak out against injustice, poor treatment of dogs and other people. I  know that this sometimes earns a label like controversial or possibly crazy, but what that means to me is that someone else heard, and by being heard have we not at least made a little difference, somewhere? How can this not be better than apathy?

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Photo by Bob Segal

And, I promised myself I would seek and endorse leaders for our clubs who understand and engage in open communication, who not only possess but also utilize negotiation skill to resolve conflict, those who actively engage in the preservation of the sport and the growth of organizations, as opposed to those who inadvertently drive membership away.

If we could all start here, by reading and understanding Viki Hayward’s – Mentoring The Power of Trust we might realize the importance of taking just one step toward turning the tide. Let’s bring new fanciers to the sport, bring success to another individual, bring back the recognition of our gorgeous purebred dogs.

I love Gordon Setters, don’t you?

What are you willing to contribute to bolster our failing sport?